When To Put the  Lesson Plans Down

9553840_orig

I saw some incredible learning today. I walked into a High School Social Studies classroom for a routine Tech Check and found myself wanting to forgo the remainder of my schedule to just to sit in. When I entered, students were providing political responses that were simple regurgitations of what their parents believe. Then suddenly a brave student said, “Mr. , what would make a good political party work?” The teacher tossed his notes to the side, pulled up a blank flip chart on his promethean board and simply said, “You tell me.” All heads were raised, eyes lit and students begin to design a Party based on their understanding of various features and characteristics of the current Democratic, Republican and Independent systems. The teacher would spit out an issue and the students would create their new party’s stance.

Personally, I despise whole group discussions regarding politics, but the students were extremely engaged. Every student had a say, I didn’t see any reluctance from anyone. Even the kid who was drawing when I walked in had something to add. The funny thing was, the students didn’t realize that they were demonstrating mastery during this activity. All they knew was this teacher valued their thoughts. What they also didn’t realize was the teacher simply wanted them to find their own voice and not the voice of others. He in turned realized to never underestimate the voice of his students.

I went a little further though. My suggestion was to provide the students with some sort of silhouette figure and decorate it by developing the perfect candidate to represent their newly created political party. Have them find a way to label the representatives characteristics, viewpoints, civic responsibilities, and anything else the would explain why they would be the exemplary candidate. This would also entail a full background that would most likely  be researched when being analyzed as a potential face of the party.

I know what you’re thinking. How many TEKS was he able to check off on that lesson. Who cares! I wonder how many students now truly understand the topic all because it suddenly became relevant. Sometimes it takes putting the lesson down for moment to make it applicable to where our students are today.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s